A Dietitian’s Pick of the 6 Best Herbs to Help Manage Anxiety

Anxiety disorders affect over 18% of people in the United States every year. Over the years, treatment options for anxiety disorders have widened to include both prescription medications and natural alternatives.

Research suggests that several herbal supplements may be helpful in managing anxiety, though more research is needed.

In this article, we’ll explore some of the most popular research-backed herbs for anxiety, as well as other treatment options to consider.

A quick look at the best herbs for anxiety

   What causes anxiety?

Anxiety is a feeling of fear or nervousness, often associated with life stressors, like health, money, work, or relationships. While anxiety is a common response to occasional stressors, such as a job interview or a medical procedure, some people experience these feelings more often.

Anxiety disorders cause frequent intense fear or nervousness that can disrupt day-to-day life. In fact, it’s estimated that up to 30% of adults experience an anxiety disorder at some point in their life.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, anxiety is caused by genetics and environmental factors, such as trauma, stress in childhood, or frequent negative or stressful life events. A family history of mental health conditions or anxiety can also increase your risk.

How can herbs help with anxiety?

Many people rely on herbs to help with mild to moderate mental health conditions, such as anxiety, to avoid the unwanted and negative side effects of medications.

Herbal medicine is a type of complementary and alternative medicine that uses medicinal plants to support optimal health or alleviate specific symptoms.

Herbs have been used to relieve mental health symptoms for centuries in some parts of the world and have gained popularity in the United States over the past few decades.

One review of more than 100 studies spanning over a 20-year period found that 45% of the studies demonstrated positive outcomes of herbal supplements on anxiety and depression symptoms with fewer negative effects than traditional medication.

Before using herbs to support your mental health and manage your anxiety symptoms, talk with a healthcare professional to avoid potential interactions with medications or health conditions.

Also keep in mind that the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) does not approve herbal supplements, so choosing herbs from a reputable company is essential for safety and effectiveness.

 

Cirino, E. (2022). 6 herbal remedies for anxiety in 2022. Healthline. Retrieved September 8, 2022, from https://www.healthline.com/health/anxiety/herbs-for-anxiety#effectiveness


5 common Myths About Medical Marijuana

Many medical experts including doctors and researchers have admitted that medical marijuana is a much safer pain management medicine than opioids and yet people continue to have misconceptions about the use of medical marijuana. These misconceptions have arisen due to a lot of misinformation about medical marijuana that was spread over the years. Today we will try to distinguish between myths and facts about medical marijuana so our readers can make an informed decision for themselves.

Myth 1: Medical marijuana is another way of getting “High”

Fact: There are over 400 chemicals found in cannabis. The two most known ones are Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD). Both these compounds effect different receptors of the brain, Where THC can cause psychoactive effects, CBD affects and modulates the 5ht serotonin receptor, which does not cause psychoactive effects or results in a “High”. In 2018 FDA declared that CBD does not cause intoxication or euphoria “high”.

Myth 2: Medical marijuana has no medicinal benefits.

Fact: Over 2500 doctors and over 500K Floridians would disagree with this statement. For centuries marijuana has been used for medicinal benefits. Medicinal marijuana provides array of benefits for patients, from the ability to treat epilepsy, anxiety disorders, chronic pain and even symptoms of cancer. Even FDA has understood the potential and has approved one cannabis-derived drug product: Epidiolex (cannabidiol), and three synthetic cannabis-related drug products: Marinol (dronabinol), Syndros (dronabinol), and Cesamet (nabilone). These approved drug products are only available with a prescription from a licensed healthcare provider.

Myth 3: I will get addicted to medical marijuana.

Fact: This is a very valid concern that patients have and fortunately using medical marijuana responsibly and with a doctor’s recommendation poses a low risk of addiction. Medical Marijuana has a very low dependency rate compared to other drugs, alcohol or even tobacco. Like any medical treatment, there is some risk associated with marijuana. However, most healthcare professionals consider it to be a safe option for managing a variety of conditions.

Myth 4: Medical marijuana causes brain damage.

Fact: New research on marijuana consumption has overwhelmingly supported the fact that marijuana use does not  appear to cause permanent brain damage, and can be used as an effective treatment for a wide range of diseases. The study was conducted by psychiatrist Igor Grant, MD. who admitted being surprised by their finding especially since there’s been a controversy for some years on whether long-term cannabis use causes brain damage

Myth 5: You can overdose on medical marijuana.

Fact: To date, there have not been any reported deaths resulting solely from cannabis use, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Marijuana is like any other medicine — you must take it in moderation to get the most out of it. When you practice safe medicating, you will have much fewer problems to worry about compared to most medications. Ask your doctor to prescribe a CBD heavy medication if this is one of your concerns.

At Genesis Medical Clinic, we are committed to helping our patients acquire their Medical Marijuana Cards and begin getting the relief they both need and deserve from medical marijuana.

 

GenAdministrator, M. C. (2021, March 31). 5 common myths about medical marijuana. Genesis Medical Clinic. Retrieved August 29, 2022, from https://mygenesismedical.com/5-common-myths-about-medical-marijuana/


New medical marijuana campaign launches in Idaho for 2024 ballot

A new state-level campaign to legalize medical marijuana in Idaho has kicked off, with advocates hoping to place an initiative on the 2024 ballot.

The proposed ballot measure – filed Aug. 16 with the Idaho secretary of state’s office by Kind Idaho – is dubbed the Idaho Medical Marijuana Act of 2024.

Backers said the initiative is “nearly identical” to one they previously attempted to place on the 2022 ballot, which fell short for several reasons.

If the new measure is ultimately successful, it would:

  • Legalize medical marijuana for qualifying patients, including those with chronic pain, cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, post-traumatic stress disorder and about a dozen other ailments.
  • Establish a non-vertically integrated market structure, with dispensaries, caregivers, manufacturers and growers, including a residency requirement for at least one principal officer of a given company.
  • The measure contains no license caps, but instead leaves most industry rulemaking to the state Department of Health and Welfare.

The Kind Idaho campaign said in a video posted to Facebook that the next step is to revisit the secretary of state’s office in about five weeks to “pick up and review the changes that the (attorney general) suggests.”

In the interim, the campaign will continue fundraising for the effort, spokespeople said.

“Nov. 1 is our target date. That’s when we want to start collecting (signatures), that’s when we need donations, funds, money rolling in so we can make sure … this petition moves along smoothly,” a campaign spokesperson said.

 

John Schroyer, C. C., Long, A., Sacirbey, O., Lamers, M., & Schaneman, B. (2022, August 22). New Medical Marijuana Campaign launches in Idaho for 2024 ballot. MJBizDaily. Retrieved August 23, 2022, from https://mjbizdaily.com/new-medical-marijuana-campaign-launches-in-idaho-for-2024-ballot/


9 Cannabis Recipes to Try at Home

When you think of cooking with cannabis, the first thing that comes to mind might be the ultimate classic—pot brownies. However, with the help of cannabutter and cannabis-infused olive oil, you can pull off plenty of other recipes, too, spanning from breakfast to dinner. Try your hand at cannabis-infused brioche French toast for a relaxing (and decadent) start to your morning, or a soothing mug of cannabis-infused tea. For dinner, cannabis-infused pasta with clams and green chiles is a fun way to experiment in the kitchen. And if you're in the mood for brownies? Don't worry, we have a recipe for those as well, plus blondies if you want to switch it up. Read on for all nine of our culinary cannabis recipes.

Note: As cannabis regulation continues to evolve across the United States and around the world, please consult your local laws.

1 of 9

Premium Cannabutter

Making cannabutter is a time-honored way of infusing cannabis into food, since so many recipes include butter as an ingredient. But not all cannabutters are created equal. Before cannabis can be used in a recipe, it must be "activated" or, in a technical sense, decarboxylated, to maximize its benefits. Traditionally, decarbing meant heating the buds at a low temperature for two to three hours in the oven. But this method can destroy flavor and lead to bitterness. But thankfully, there's a better (and more delicious) way. Decarbing using the sous-vide technique eliminates the uneven and often harsh heat of the old-school method and preserves the fragrant, floral compounds in cannabis known as terpenes. Here's how to make this cannabutter step by step. Recipes for Cannabis-Infused Jam-Stuffed Brioche French Toast, Buttered Pasta with Clams and Green Chiles, or Citrus-Caramel Blondies are great places to start cooking with it. Note: As cannabis regulation continues to evolve across the United States and around the world, please consult your local laws.

Ingredients

3.5 grams cannabis flower (about 1/8 ounce)
3 tablespoons distilled water
1 cup unsalted butter (8 ounces), preferably organic and grass-fed

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Set immersion circulator to 200°F and place in a medium saucepan filled with tap water. Grind the cannabis buds into small pieces and place in the vacuum-sealable bag with 3 tablespoons distilled water. Using the vacuum sealer, seal the bag completely.

  • When the circulator reaches 200°F, drop the sealed bag into the water and decarb for 30 minutes, turning the bag every 5 to 10 minutes to ensure the cannabis is submerged in water.

  • Transfer the bag to a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking and preserve the terpenes; let cool. Melt butter in a small saucepan; add cannabis, and simmer, stirring often, for 20 minutes. Remove the saucepan from the heat and let the butter mixture steep for another 30 minutes.

  • Strain the mixture through a fine mesh sieve into a shallow container with an airtight lid. You’ll have 12 tablespoons (3/4 cup) of cannabutter, with about 43mg of THC per tablespoon based on a 20% THC strain. Keep refrigerated and use it within 30 days.

2 of 9

Cannabis-Infused Tea with Rose and Lavender

Ingredients

Cannabis Tincture

Tea Blend

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Preheat oven to 220F; spread cannabis on a small baking sheet. Bake cannabis for 45 minutes; transfer to a bowl and let cool.

  • Pour alcohol into an 8-ounce glass jar and secure the lid. Separately, place jar and cannabis in the freezer for 1 hour. Add cannabis to alcohol in jar, seal tightly and shake tincture vigorously for several minutes. Return jar to the freezer for 24 hours, shaking jar at least 3 or 4 times during that period.

  • Set a fine-mesh strainer over a large liquid measuring cup with a spout; line strainer with a paper coffee filter. Pour tincture through filter; discard filter. Using a small funnel, pour tincture into four 2-ounce dark-glass dropper bottles. Tincture is ready to use immediately, although it will become more potent (but darker and more bitter) over time. Store tincture in the refrigerator for up to 1 year.

  • To make the tea blend, combine the tea ingredients and store in an airtight container until ready to use. To prepare a cup of tea, steep 1 teaspoon of tea blend in 1½ cups of boiling water until infused, about 5 minutes (or according to preference). Stir in cannabis tincture to your taste (see below for THC dosage information) and sweeten as desired.

     

3 of 9

Cannabis-Infused Citrus-Caramel Blondies

Ingredients

Caramel

Blondies

Directions

Make the Caramel
  • In a small saucepan, combine the granulated sugar with 1 tablespoon of water and bring to a boil. Using a wet pastry brush, wash down any crystals on the side of the pan. Boil the syrup over moderately high heat until a deep amber caramel forms, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and immediately whisk in the cream, butter and Maldon sea salt. Let the caramel cool to room temperature.

Make the Blondies
  • Preheat the oven to 350°. Spray an 8-inch square metal baking pan with nonstick cooking spray and line the pan with parchment paper, allowing 1 inch of overhang on 2 opposite sides; spray the paper. In a small bowl, whisk the flour with the kosher salt and baking powder. In a medium bowl, whisk the unsalted butter, Premium Cannabutter, and brown sugar until combined, then whisk in the eggs and orange zest. Add the flour mixture and stir until just incorporated.

  • Spread the batter in the prepared pan in an even layer. Drizzle the caramel over the top, then swirl it decoratively using a toothpick. Bake the blondie for 25 to 30 minutes, until it is golden on top and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out with a few moist crumbs attached. Let cool completely. Lift the blondie out by the overhanging parchment and peel off the paper. Cut into bars and serve.

Make Ahead

The blondies can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days.

Notes

Each serving contains about 8 mg THC based on the Premium Cannabutter recipe and a 20% THC strain of cannabis.

Maldon sea salt has a great crunch and a remarkably subtle, briny flavor. It is available at most grocery stores and online.

This recipe was developed in partnership with Kitchen Toke, the first media company dedicated to teaching people about culinary cannabis for health and wellness.

4 of 9

Cannabis-Infused Olive Oil

Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Set the immersion circulator to 200°F and place in a medium saucepan filled halfway with water. Grind the cannabis buds into small pieces and place in the vacuum-sealable bag with the distilled water. Using the vacuum sealer, seal the bag completely. When the circulator reaches 200°F, drop the sealed bag into the water and decarb for 30 minutes, rotating the bag every 5 to 10 minutes.

  • Transfer the bag to a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking and to preserve the terpenes; let cool. Set a fine-mesh sieve over a bowl; strain and reserve the cannabis, discarding the liquid.

  • In a small saucepan, combine oil and cannabis in a small saucepan and bring to a gentle simmer over medium heat; continue to cook for 20 minutes, stirring often. Remove saucepan from the heat and let steep for 30 minutes more.

  • Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a resealable heat-proof food container with an airtight lid. Keep refrigerated and use within 30 days.

     

5 of 9

Cannabis-Infused Pasta with Clams and Green Chiles

Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • In a blender, combine 1/2 cup of the olive oil with 1/4 cup of the mint and the parsley and chives and puree until smooth. Strain the herb oil through a fine-mesh sieve into a small bowl, pressing on the solids; discard the solids in the sieve.

  • In a large cast-iron skillet, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil until nearly smoking. Add the poblanos, Cubanelle, shishitos and a generous pinch each of salt and pepper. Cook over high heat, stirring occasionally, until blistered in spots and just softened, about 3 minutes. Add the minced shallot, minced garlic and capers and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until just softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Let cool slightly, then stir in the herb oil.

  • In a large pot, toast the mixed spices over moderate heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add the sliced shallots and crushed garlic, then carefully add the wine and simmer until reduced by half, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the clam juice and bring to a boil. Add the clams, cover and steam over high heat, stirring occasionally, until the clams open, about 10 minutes. Using tongs, transfer the clams to a large rimmed baking sheet to cool slightly, then remove the meat from the shells; discard the shells and any clams that do not open. Strain the clam cooking liquid through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl; discard the solids.

  • Meanwhile, in a large pot of salted boiling water, cook the pasta until al dente. Drain well.

  • Wipe out the pot. Add the butter and cook until melted. Add the clams, chile mixture, pasta, crème fraîche and 1/2 cup of the strained clam cooking liquid and cook over moderately high heat, tossing, until hot, about 3 minutes. Stir in the Premium Cannabutter, lime juice, and the remaining 1/2 cup of mint and season generously with salt and pepper. Transfer to bowls, garnish with more mint and the wasabi masago and serve right away.

     

6 of 9

Cannabis-Infused Olive Oil Citrus Cake

Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Preheat oven to 325°F. Line the bottom of a 9-inch round cake pan with parchment paper; lightly grease and flour pan. Set aside. Whisk together cake flour, semolina flour, baking powder and salt in a medium bowl; set aside.

  • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, combine sugar, extra-virgin olive oil, Cannabis-Infused Olive Oil, milk, lemon zest, 1 tablespoon orange zest, and the vanilla bean paste. Beat on medium until well combined, about 2 minutes. With mixer still on medium, add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Reduce speed to low and gradually add flour mixture, beating until just combined, about 30 seconds. Using a rubber spatula, scrape whisk attachment to release any trapped citrus zest and fold it into the batter.

  • Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake until risen in the middle and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out with moist crumbs, 32 to 38 minutes. Let cake cool in pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes; run a knife along the edge and invert onto a plate. Flip cake, top-side up, to the wire rack to cool completely, about 1 1/2 hours.

  • Whisk together powdered sugar, lemon juice and remaining 1 tablespoon orange zest in a small bowl. Set wire rack with cake over a parchment-lined sheet pan. Pour glaze over cake and gently spread to the edges using a small offset spatula, allowing some of the glaze to drip down the sides of the cake. Let stand until glaze hardens, at least 30 minutes or up to 4 hours. Transfer cake to a serving plate. Garnish with citrus just before serving.

7 of 9

Cannabis-Infused Chocolate Pretzel Cookies

Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Instructions Checklist
  • Whisk together flour, baking powder and salt in a medium bowl; set aside. Beat sugar, cocoa powder and both types of oil in a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment on medium-low until evenly moistened and mixture resembles wet sand, about 1 minute. With mixer on medium-low, add eggs, one at a time, beating until well combined after each addition, stopping to scrape sides of bowl as needed. Stir in vanilla bean paste. With mixer on low, gradually add flour mixture. Beat until well combined, 30 to 45 seconds, stopping to scrape sides of bowl as needed. Cover and chill dough at least 2 hours (or up to 2 days).

  • Preheat oven to 350°F. Line 3 baking sheets with parchment paper (or work in batches with 1 or 2 baking sheets). Place powdered sugar in a small shallow bowl. Spray a 1 3/4-inch cookie scoop with cooking spray; scoop dough and drop a ball into the powdered sugar and roll to generously coat. Transfer dough ball to a baking sheet. Press a pretzel into the center of the dough ball, gently flattening to form a 2-inch disc. Repeat with remaining dough, powdered sugar and pretzels, spraying scoop with cooking spray as needed and spacing dough discs at least 1 ½ inches apart. Freeze dough discs, uncovered, on baking sheets for at least 10 minutes (or up to 1 hour).

  • Bake cookies in batches in preheated oven until puffy and just set, about 12 minutes for soft and fudgy cookies or 14 minutes for a firmer, cake-like texture. Let cookies cool completely on baking sheets, about 30 minutes. Store cookies in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days.

     

8 of 9

Cannabis-Infused Salted Caramel Fudge Brownies

Ingredients

CARAMEL
BROWNIES

Directions

Make the caramel
  • In a medium saucepan, cook the sugar with the water over moderate heat, swirling the pan frequently, until a dark amber caramel forms. Slowly drizzle in the cream, then whisk in the butter and sea salt. Transfer the caramel to a small bowl and refrigerate until thickened, about 2 hours.

Make the brownies
  • Preheat the oven to 325°. Lightly butter a 9-by-13-inch metal baking pan. Melt 14 tablespoons of butter, plus 2 tablespoons cannabutter in a heatproof medium bowl set over (not in) a saucepan of simmering water. Add the chopped chocolate, the sugar, cocoa powder, vanilla and salt and stir until smooth. Remove the bowl from the heat and whisk in the eggs. Add the flour and stir until just incorporated. Line baking pan with parchment. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and bake the brownies for about 40 minutes, until a tester inserted in the center comes out with a few moist crumbs attached. Transfer the pan to a rack and let cool completely.

  • Invert the brownies onto a cutting board and cut in half to form 2 rectangles. Spread the chilled caramel over 1 rectangle, then top with the other rectangle. Cut into 12 bars and serve immediately

Make Ahead

The caramel can be refrigerated for 2 weeks. The brownies can be refrigerated for 3 days or frozen for 1 month.

9 of 9

Cannabis-Infused Brioche French Toast

Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Preheat the oven to 350°. In a small bowl, stir together jam and Cannabutter. Cut a 2-inch pocket in the side of each brioche slice; spoon 1 heaping tablespoon of jam mixture into each one.

  • In a shallow bowl, whisk the eggs with the cream, granulated sugar and 1/2 teaspoon of fleur de sel.

  • In a large skillet, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter. Dip 2 slices of the stuffed brioche in the egg mixture and soak until saturated. Add to the skillet and cook over moderate heat until nicely browned on both sides, about 2 minutes. Transfer the French toast to a baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining butter, brioche and egg mixture.

  • Bake the French toast for about 5 minutes, until cooked through. Transfer to plates and sift confectioners’ sugar evenly on top. Dollop crème fraîche and strawberry jam on the French toast. Squeeze a little lemon juice over each slice and sprinkle with fleur de sel. Serve right away.

     

Editors, F. & W. (2021). 9 cannabis recipes to try at home. Food & Wine. Retrieved August 22, 2022, from https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/cannabis-recipes


Medical Marijuana FAQ

While every state has laws dictating the use of medical marijuana, more than two thirds of U.S. states and the District of Columbia have actually legalized it for medical treatments and more are considering bills to do the same. Yet while many people are using marijuana, the FDA has only approved it for treatment of two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. 

Why hasn't more research been done? One reason is that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) considers marijuana a Schedule I drug, the same as heroin, LSD, and ecstasy, and likely to be abused and lacking in medical value. Because of that, researchers need a special license to study it, says Marcel Bonn-Miller, PhD, a substance abuse specialist at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.

That may not change anytime soon. The DEA considered reclassifying marijuana as a Schedule II drug like Ritalin or oxycodone, but decided to keep it as a Schedule I drug.

The agency did, however, agree to support additional research on marijuana and make the process easier for researchers."Research is critically needed, because we have to be able to advise patients and doctors on the safe and effective use of cannabis," Bonn-Miller says.

He shared some background on medical marijuana's uses and potential side effects.

What is medical marijuana?

Medical marijuana uses the marijuana plant or chemicals in it to treat diseases or conditions. It's basically the same product as recreational marijuana, but it's taken for medical purposes.

The marijuana plant contains more than 100 different chemicals called cannabinoids. Each one has a different effect on the body. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the main chemicals used in medicine. THC also produces the "high" people feel when they smoke marijuana or eat foods containing it.

What is medical marijuana used for?

Researchers are studying whether medical marijuana can help treat a number of conditions including:

But it’s not yet proven to help many of these conditions, with a few exceptions, Bonn-Miller says.

"The greatest amount of evidence for the therapeutic effects of cannabis relate to its ability to reduce chronic pain, nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy, and spasticity [tight or stiff muscles] from MS," Bonn-Miller says.

How does it help?

Cannabinoids -- the active chemicals in medical marijuana -- are similar to chemicals the body makes that are involved in appetite, memory, movement, and pain.

Limited research suggests cannabinoids might:

  • Reduce anxiety
  • Reduce inflammation and relieve pain
  • Control nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy
  • Kill cancer cells and slow tumor growth
  • Relax tight muscles in people with MS
  • Stimulate appetite and improve weight gain in people with cancer and AIDS

Can medical marijuana help with seizure disorders?

Medical marijuana received a lot of attention a few years ago when parents said that a special form of the drug helped control seizures in their children. The FDA recently approved Epidiolex, which is made from CBD, as a therapy for people with very severe or hard-to-treat seizures. In studies, some people had a dramatic drop in seizures after taking this drug.

Has the FDA approved medical marijuana?

The cannabidiol Epidiolex was approved in 2018 for treating seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome. In addition, the FDA has approved two man-made cannabinoid medicines -- dronabinol (MarinolSyndros) and nabilone (Cesamet) -- to treat nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy.

How do you take it?

To take medical marijuana, you can:

  • Smoke it
  • Inhale it through a device called a vaporizer that turns it into a mist
  • Eat it -- for example, in a brownie or lollipop
  • Apply it to your skin in a lotion, spray, oil, or cream
  • Place a few drops of a liquid under your tongue

How you take it is up to you. Each method works differently in your body. "If you smoke or vaporize cannabis, you feel the effects very quickly," Bonn-Miller says. "If you eat it, it takes significantly longer. It can take 1 to 2 hours to experience the effects from edible products."

Casarella, J. (2021). Medical marijuana FAQ. WebMD. Retrieved August 19, 2022, from https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/medical-marijuana-faq


New Florida Marijuana Legalization Initiative Filed For 2024 Ballot, With Backing Of State’s Largest Medical Cannabis Company

A new industry-led campaign in Florida filed a marijuana legalization initiative aimed at the 2024 ballot on Monday.

Past attempts to place adult-use legalization on the Florida ballot have been challenged and rejected by the state Supreme Court. But the Smart & Safe Florida political committee says the language of their proposed amendment to the state’s marijuana law will avoid such a contest and prevail.

The initiative is being backed by the state’s largest medical cannabis operator Trulieve, along with musicians with the country band The Bellamy Brothers, who are featured in an initial ad for the effort that talks about the economic opportunities and civil liberties implications of recreational legalization.

If approved, the measure would allow existing medical cannabis companies like Trulieve to begin selling marijuana to all adults over 21. It contains a provision that would allow—but not require—lawmakers to take steps toward the approval of additional businesses. Home cultivation by consumers would not be allowed under the proposal as drafted.

The campaign filed paperwork to get approval to begin signature gathering with the state Division of Elections on Monday, The News Service of Florida first reported. In order to qualify for the 2024 ballot, activists will need to collect about 900,000 valid signatures from registered voters.

If approved, the measure would allow existing medical cannabis companies like Trulieve to begin selling marijuana to all adults over 21. It contains a provision that would allow—but not require—lawmakers to take steps toward the approval of additional businesses. Home cultivation by consumers would not be allowed under the proposal as drafted.

The campaign filed paperwork to get approval to begin signature gathering with the state Division of Elections on Monday, The News Service of Florida first reported. In order to qualify for the 2024 ballot, activists will need to collect about 900,000 valid signatures from registered voters.

Under the proposal, adults 21 and older would be able to purchase and possess up to one ounce of cannabis, only five grams of which could be marijuana concentrate products. The three-page measure also omits equity provisions favored by advocates such as expungements or other relief for people with prior cannabis convictions.

Trulieve is providing initial seed money to the tune of $5 million to get the campaign off the ground. But the company’s CEO Kim Rivers said that they expect other industry stakeholders to get involved on the financial side of the campaign as well.

While Florida voters approved a medical cannabis constitutional amendment in 2016, subsequent attempts to place broader legalization on the ballot have been rejected by the state Supreme Court, which has ruled that the language of proposed measures by Make It Legal Florida and Sensible Florida were misleading, invalidating them.

“Every initiative has provided some level of learning,” Rivers told the News Service of Florida. “With this initiative, the authors have taken a hard look at the Supreme Court rulings surrounding the previous efforts and taken that into consideration. We believe it’s a very appropriate and narrowly focused amendment that does defer appropriately to the legislature.”

Trulieve is providing initial seed money to the tune of $5 million to get the campaign off the ground. But the company’s CEO Kim Rivers said that they expect other industry stakeholders to get involved on the financial side of the campaign as well.

While Florida voters approved a medical cannabis constitutional amendment in 2016, subsequent attempts to place broader legalization on the ballot have been rejected by the state Supreme Court, which has ruled that the language of proposed measures by Make It Legal Florida and Sensible Florida were misleading, invalidating them.

“Every initiative has provided some level of learning,” Rivers told the News Service of Florida. “With this initiative, the authors have taken a hard look at the Supreme Court rulings surrounding the previous efforts and taken that into consideration. We believe it’s a very appropriate and narrowly focused amendment that does defer appropriately to the legislature.”

Jaeger, Kyle. “New Florida Marijuana Legalization Initiative Filed for 2024 Ballot, with Backing of State’s Largest Medical Cannabis Company.” Marijuana Moment, 8 Aug. 2022, https://www.marijuanamoment.net/new-florida-marijuana-legalization-initiative-filed-for-2024-ballot-with-backing-of-states-largest-medical-cannabis-company/